askalanaquestion.com . . . a resource for pool and spa help and informed shopping!!!

 

Home page icom

  A backyard pool to enjoy all season long.   A backyard spa for pure enjoyment.   Shopping in the website stores.   ColorQ digital water analyzers, for pools and spas.   Big sale in the website store.   Pool and spa help-line.  
 

Welcome
Page

 

Pool
Problems
  Spa
Problems
  Website
Shopping
  Water
Testers
  What's
On Sale
  E-Mail A
Question
 


twitter.com/poolandspahelp

     


search tips sitemap

 

Cloudy Spa or Hot Tub Water

Dealing with the many causes of this common spa problem.
 
The Pool and Spa Informational Website
askalanaquestion.com

Possible Causes and Effective Solutions.
 

 
 

Scroll down to browse through some archived SPA and Hot Tub questions and answers.  Please click the Spa Topics Link, on top of every page, to access a complete listing of Spa and Hot Tub Problem subjects, an alphabetized Website Table of Contents, Spa and Hot Tub Equipment Information, About Alan Biographic Material and a Spa and Hot Tub Glossary. Use the other links to access additional subject information. More information about some new and unique products, for Spas and Hot Tubs, can be found by visiting The Website Store. You'll never know what you'll find and that's always fun. Be better prepared and avoid costly problems!

 
Mini Salt Chlorine Generator, for spas and swim spas.
Photo-catalytic porous ceramic
crystals contain Nano-Titanium
, utilized in the new Nano-Stick
Clarifiers for Spas and Pools.

Why settle for 20th century results, when you can have all the benefits of a  21st century revolution in spa water clarity?

Light activates the Nano-Titanium and organic contamination is destroyed, while spa water clarity and quality improves.



This is how
Nano-Titanium
reflectors look
under the
microscope.



 

Plug-n-Play spa salt chlorine generator system
Model SV battery-powered Spa Vacuum. METALTRAP Filters remove iron, copper and manganese.
BlasterAutomatic Filter Cartridge Cleaners for pools and spas. ColorQ digital water analyzer.
The Nano-Stick Pool and Spa Clarifier Sticks are a revolutionary way to improve water clarity, while eliminating all types or organic contamination and lasts 3-4 months.  No Installation is required.  Simply hang the Nano-Stick, in the pool or spa.  The addition of a Nano-Stick Spa Clarifier, which lasts 3-4 months, and works 24/7 to oxidize fine suspended particles, that might otherwise past right through filters.  Clearly better!  Available in pool and spa sizesOn Sale Now!!!

Click any image for more product and ordering information.

Free Shipping

Shipping is FREE* . . . within the Continental U.S.

* A $9.99 handling charge will apply to Continental U.S. Orders, under $75.00.  U.S. Orders outside of the Continental U.S. may require some additional charge, based on quantity and destination.

How to keep your spa, swim spa or hot tub water crystal-clear? Cloudiness is one of the most frequent problems that a spa or hot tub owner will encounter. There is no one cause of cloudy, murky, milky, gray, hazy or dull spa or hot tub water problems: suspended insoluble particles, dead algae, organic debris, poor or inadequate filtration, inadequate sanitation, poor water chemistry, poor source water quality, vandalism and more, all have to be factored into the treatment. A spa water color problem is frequently with presence of heavy metals and may or may not be associated with cloudy spa water conditions. Foamy spa conditions, resulting from the aeration of soaps formed by body oils and cosmetic residues reacting with the natural alkalinity of the water, can detract from optimum water clarity. Most spas and hot tubs do maintain clear water conditions, with good water clarity. For those occasional problems, many chemical products and non-chemical devices are available that help to restore the water quality to crystal clear.  The addition of a Nano-Stick Spa and Hot Tub Clarifier, which lasts 3-4 months, and works 24/7 to oxidize fine suspended particles, that might otherwise past right through filters, is a clearly better way to maintain optimum clarity, on an ongoing basis. If problems arise, refer to the Spa Problems Page, as a source of problem-solving information, broken down into various categories. Scroll down the page and click on the linked keywords, catch phrases or images, in the archived answers below, to access additional information, on that topic or product.

Join our E-Letter Mailing List.
 

You'll receive 1-3 E-Letters a month, featuring helpful pool and spa advice, new product information and sale announcements.  All we require is your e-mail address and you can opt out anytime you wish.  Your information will never be shared or sold.
 

▼     Helpful, Problem-Solving Information, in a question and answer format.     ▼

Spa Water Has Gone Hazy?

Hi Alan. My spa has developed a milky white haze in the water. You can still see the bottom through the hazy water, but in the direct sunlight I donít think you will be able to.  I have only ever seen this after a big session, where all sorts of impurities like alcohol etc. end up in the water.  Normally I would simply dump the water and start again but we are having water restrictions due to the drought conditions here in Australia and we are not permitted to refill spa's or pools or even wash our cars with a hose. It is a 1500 litre outdoor spa and I sanitise it with bromine tablets in a floating type chlorinator.  It is tiled with dark blue tiles, which make it easier to see the haze in the water.  I regularly use a test kit to test free chlorine (DPD tablets), pH, alkalinity and acid demand.  I usually keep the bromine level about 5, pH about 7.7 and alkalinity between 80-120.

What happened:
One day about 2 months ago, I tested the water and the bromine level had jumped well up above 11, so I left the brominator out for a few weeks until the level had come down. Then over the next month I progressively closed the brominator down to maintain the bromine level at about 4. The brominator was now practically closed but still maintaining a normal level! Last week I looked at the water and it looked a little bit hazy, so I ran the filter for longer than normal. This week the water is really hazy, so I did a bromine check and it is 0. The pH is about 7.2 and the alkalinity is about 70ppm. Why the bromine is now so low I do not know, I suspect that I may have had a bromine tablet which was very strong and this is what caused the bromine level to go so uncharacteristically high a few months ago, and now that that tablet has finally dissolved the brominator was closed way too far.

What I did:
So I opened the brominator back up to where it was a few months ago, and shocked the water with about 100g of chlorine, cleaned the filter and ran the filter for about 6 hours, but with no luck.  I found that, when I turned the blower on, the water foams a lot, which is not normal.  I cleaned the filter again afterwards, but it was still basically clean.  The water is still as milky as it was before I started. I have never used a water clarifier before because I have never found them necessary.  Do you think this might be a solution to my problem? And do you think the 100g of chlorine would be enough to make the water safe to use again? Regards.

Michael, Australia, 1/20/2014


I'm afraid that there is no clear cut answer to the problem, as you are describing it. However, there are some very good possibilities. The drought has prevented you from changing the water. Not knowing how long the water has been in use and what the calcium hardness level is, leaves open the possibility that the water is too high in calcium hardness and/or total dissolved solids. Have the water tested to determine, if there is a problem with these parameters. The fact that water worsened, after the bromine level bottomed out, allows for the possibility that a bacterial slime caused the cloudiness. The subsequent additions of chlorine and bromine may have only partially decomposed the bacteria. The addition of a Nano-Stick
Nano-Stick Clarifiers, forall types of pools and spas. Clarifier can destroy organic wastes, body oils and organic byproducts, that detract from the water clarity and cause more foaming, due to spa formation. This 10 inch stick is simply hung in the spa and can last for 3-4 months. The fact that your water is foaming, beyond what you consider normal, points to another possibility. Heavy bather use can introduce high levels of body oils and cosmetic residues and this can lead to cloudiness. In addition, the natural alkalinity of the water can cause these oils to form "soaps" and this will lead directly to increased foaming. Adding the NanoStick can eliminate the organic byproducts that lead to soap formation and foaming.  It is not possible that the bromine tablet was too strong! A hundred grams of chlorine is a significant amount in a spa of your size. Even though you are adding chlorine, you must test for bromine, as the chlorine will convert to bromine. I would not recommend using the spa unless the bromine level is within safe limits and has been there for at least 30 minutes. When using a floating brominator, try and keep a reasonable level of tablets in the feeder at all times. Do not allow all the tablets to dissolve before adding more. This will allow for low levels of bromine and the possibility of poor sanitation.  While bromine alone can provide good results, having an ozonator will make it much easier. It will reduce chemical usage and allow you to maintain a lower and more comfortable bromine level.

If this website was helpful, in solving your problem, please consider joining our E-Letter Mailing List.  You'll receive 1-2 E-Letters a month, with helpful information, new product updates, suggestions and sale announcements. I hope that I have provided enough information to point you in the right direction. Good luck.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 1/20/2014


High Efficiency Filter Cartridge?

I am debating switching my regular filter to a disposable micro filter. It was independently tested and is 94 % efficient at removing particles at 1 micron. With this filter, you are supposed to get rid of using defoamers, decalcifiers, basically any liquids normally added to the tub. The filters will last 2-4 months and are about $30. Less expensive than using all the other materials. According to the company, it will remove all particles that can cause damage to the hot tub. Of course, you still need to have sanitizer in the tub. Just wondering if you had an info or thoughts on these filters. The spa manufacturer, in my city, sells all their tubs with these filters and has for over 3 years. Thanks in advance of your thought. Cheers

Derek, Canada, 1/14/2013


Depending upon the quality of your source water a high efficiency filter cartridge can make a significant difference. It will certainly remove very small particulates and some microorganisms. It will not make the water in the spa sanitary and will not
One of the ColorQ all-digital, pool and spa water analyzers. remove salts that are in true solution. Organic wastes, byproducts, body oils and other contaminants, can pass right through filters. A Nano-Stick Spa Clarifier can remove these materials, without the use of chemicals or result in anything being added to the water. It is the latest technology, that can clearly produce better water quality. Better filtration should improve water quality and reduce the need for some or most of the accessory chemicals. You will still have to maintain a proper sanitizer level and keep the pH, TA and calcium hardness within acceptable ranges. There is no doubt that this type of filter is better than the standard spa cartridges, but they can't remove everything.  good water tester can go a long way towards helping to maintain proper chemistry, which will effect the over water clarity and quality.  The ColorQ water analyzers are all-digital, easy to use and eliminate all color-matching and guesswork.  I hope that I have been helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 1/14/2013


Cloudy Spa Water?

Before using the spa, the water is always clear. After using it for about 20 minutes the water is cloudy. I use bromine to sanitize. Is that normal? Thank you.

Josh, Ellenville, NY, 1/15/2009

BlasterAutomatic Filter Cartridge Cleaners for pools and spas.
It is hard to be very specific with so little information. If your spa had a sanitizer level prior to your entering the water, it under
standable that the water would be clear. Twenty minutes later, a lot of body oils, dead skin and sweat has been introduced into the water. At this point, the sanitizer level has been reduced or depleted. I suggest that after using the spa, you test the water. If there is little sanitizer present, it would a good idea to add a quick dissolving shock: a non-chlorine product is usually a good choice.  This will help boost the bromine level and help restore clarity. Are you maintaining a bromine level of 3-5 PPM? You might consider adding a Nano-Stick Clarifier to help eliminate organic byproducts, wastes and debris. This could be part of the reason the water is not as clear, as you would like. Your spa most likely has a cartridge filter and it has to be cleaned on a regular basis. An easy way to clean the filter is with THE BLASTER. It is an automatic cartridge filter cleaner that simply attaches to a garden hose. I hope that I have been of assistance. Enjoy the spa?
 
Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 1/15/2009


Remaining Cloudy?

We use a biguanide chemical system for our spa. We have had cloudy water for the past few weeks. We bring in water samples and they are good. We bought a new filter but the water remains cloudy. Any ideas that can help fix up our water? Thanks.

Bob E., 10/4/2012


The prolonged use of biguanide can lead to the development of sanitizer resistant microorganisms, after a few years of product use. This typeFrog Mineral Hybrid Water Care System of problem borders on the inevitable and while it might not be the cause of the current problem, it has to be considered a possibility. Try adding shock and a blue clarifier to the spa. If the water fails to improve, the resistant microorganism possibility becomes more likely. The only recourse is to drain and clean the spa and permanently switch to another type of sanitizing. People that use biguanide frequently do so in order to avoid obvious chemical sanitizing. If that is the case, you should consider installing an ozonator and using bromine or a mineral sanitizer as a backup. The use of ozone will provide much better water quality without an overbearing chemical presence and the use of a backup sanitizer will afford greater protection. This sanitizing approach is far less likely to allow the development of a sanitizer-resistant microorganism.  I hope that this information will prove to be useful. If askalanaquestion.com was helpful in providing information, please tell your friends and dealers about the website.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 10/5/2012

big sale graphic

Look at Some of What's On Sale!!!

Limited-Time-Only Savings on interesting products.
Shop with Security and Safety.
Protected on a secure server, with SSL encryption.
ColorQ digital water analyzer. Plug-n-Play spa salt chlorine generator system BlasterAutomatic Filter Cartridge Cleaners for pools and spas. Magnetic water conditioner help solve scaling and hardness problems.
ColorQ All-Digital
Water Analyzers
Spa Salt Chlorine
Generators, (6)
Automatic Filter Cartridge Cleaner Magnetic
Water Conditioner
Visit The Website Store for more unique and problem-solving products.

Needs Clearing Up?

Hey Alan!! You helped me out several years ago on many occasions with your useful answers concerning my pool (my giant chemistry set). Now, I have a spa question - my new giant chemistry set. I have a brand new 6-seat Spa (370 gallons) and am starting chemicals (a Bromine system). Iím up on scale & stain and the proper levels on bromine, pH, Alkalinity and Iíve shocked it once (basically, all the start-up chemicals). The test strip looks great. A defoamer product took care of lots of foam and thatís all good now. The water is still pretty cloudy. The chemicals have been in about 3 days. Thereís no mention of an algaecide or flocking agents or anything like that on the spa side like I use on my pool. So how do I clear up the water? Thanks! Warm and cloudy.

John M., 11/11/2009


Algaecides are not normally used in a spa, unless the unit is left uncovered and there are recurring algae problems. Flock is not something I go out of my way to recommend, even in a pool. However, you can try using a Nano-Stick Clarifier. This type of product can help remove fine particles. organic wastes & byproducts and debris, that might be passing through the filter. Make sure that the filter cartridge is installed properly! It is possible that water chemistry factors have conspired to cause the cloudiness: check the pH, TA and calcium hardness level. If everything checks out right and the bromine levels have remained normal, I would try an keep the bromine levels closer to 5 PPM. This type of chemical can help digest organic debris and wastes that might be contributing to the problem.  I hope that this information will prove helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 11/11/2009


 How Does a Nano-Stick Clarifier Work?

I have noticed, that you suggest using a Nano-Stick Clarifier, to improve spa water quality. How does this product work? Thanks so much.
Nano-Spray uses new technology to help preserve spa covers.
Linda D., Bethpage, NY, FL 11/28/2011


Good question!!! The product was developed by a leading producer of filtration equipment, for a host of industries.  The Nano-
Stick Clarifier is based on something called Nano-Titanium, which in a ceramic form, can result in major improvements in the water clarity and quality. This is not an ordinary clarifier - this is a 21st Century product. There is even a Nano-Spray, which helps preserve the life of your spa's thermal cover. I hope that you will find this material interesting.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster. 9/28/2011


Pink Spa Water Color?

My new Spa (about 8 weeks old) has developed a pinkish color (very faint). I am wondering what could have caused it. The alkaline and pH balance is just fine (maybe pH could be a bit lower). And my bromine level is very low. I've got several tablets floating around for about 1 week, but can't seem to bring it up to the right level yet. I tried to shock the water and also added a couple of capfuls of Water Clarifier. It seems to have helped a lot, but the pink is still slightly there. Any idea how to bring up the bromine level, and get rid of the pinkish color forever? PS. I live in N. California. If that makes a difference. Thanks.

Smeeta G., California, 10/7/2004


While it possible that some combination of trace minerals is responsible for the discoloration, it is more likely that this is a bacterial problem, caused by inadequate sanitation. I base this on the fact that you are unable to maintain a satisfactory bromine level and are using slow-dissolving bromine tablets. There's nothing wrong with the bromine, but it doesn't play catch-up very well. You must keep adding shock, until you get a bromine level that remains in the 3-5 PPM range for an overnight period. Thereafter, keep the bromine dispenser as full as possible and use shock to quickly boost the level or restore it after periods of usage. An ozonator will make the task of spa sanitizing much easier and reduce the chemical usage. With an ozonator present, you can use bromine as a sanitizer backup. I hope that I have been helpful. Enjoy the same.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 10/7/2004

How to reduce Cloudy Spa Water problems.

Use a salt Chlorine Generator for better control,  with fewer chemical byproducts.
Keep a cleaner filter cartridge, for reduced chlorine consumption.
Remove dirt and sediments and reduce chemical usage.
Better water clarity, using Nano-Titanium Technology.
Plug-n-Play Salt Chlorine Generators for spas. Automatic Filter Cartridge Cleaner Model SV battery-powered Spa Vacuum. Nano-Technology pool and spa clarifiers
A salt chlorine generator better control and reduces buildup problems. This automatic filter cartridge cleaner will remove dirt and sediments. A handy, battery-powered spa vacuum will easily remove sediment and debris. Use a 21st Century approach to water clarity, with new Nano-Technology.
Click on any image for complete product and ordering information.

Biofilm Accumulations?

My spa was drained and shut down for about 6 weeks waiting on a repairman. After refilling it I noticed stuff floating in the water after turning the jets off. It almost looks like large pieces of dead skin. I guess it is some kind of algae or pipe scum. I have drained and cleaned it over 8 or 9 times, using a shop-vac to suck out all the jets, I have used a "slime" product about 5 times. I have let the jets run for hours on end trying to filter it out, and I still keep getting this crap as soon as I refill it and turn the jets on. Could you please tell me what I can get to get rid of this "pipe scum." It is breaking me up in water bills and chemical bills. I've not been able to get in my spa for over a year now. PLEASE HELP my family and I are begging. Thanks.

Todd R., Burgin, Kentucky, 11/18/2009


It sounds like you have an accumulation of dead microorganisms in your lines. I suggest that you boost the chlorine or bromine
WaterLink SPIN Lab - professional in-store testing. level to 10 PPM and keep it elevated until all of this biofilm has been decomposed. Keep the filter operating and maintain proper water chemistry. Once enough chlorine has been added to decompose all of the debris, you should be able to resume normal operations. For free chlorine testing, I suggest using LaMotte Insta-Test strips or a ColorQ Digital Water Tester, as they provide the right kind of information. To better assure proper overall spa water chemistry, visit a pool/spa store that has a very reliable, professional lab such as a WaterLink SPIN Lab or Pinpoint system, rather than a less accurate test kit or strip reader. To locate a dealer near you, go to: LaMotte Professional Testing Center Locator.  I hope that I have been of help.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 11/18/2009


Suffering With Scale?

We live in a hard water area. I've had problems with my spa due to scale forming. Besides the scale deposits, I've had white flakes shooting out of the returns. Any suggestions?

J. H., Mesa, AZ, 5/6/2007

Magnetic water conditioner for pools and spas.
You could fill you spa with soft water, that is if you have one. Some manufacturers recommend against using soften water,
but if you adjust all of the spa water chemistry parameters - especially the calcium hardness, pH and total alkalinity - to within normal suggested ranges, there should be no problems. You could add a calcium sequestering agent and try to keep the pH closer to 7.2 and the TA, if possible, within 80-120 PPM. A spa water magnetizer or magnetic water conditioner is another possibility. This strap-on device has been reported to help reduce spa calcium scaling problems, as well as improve some other spa water parameters. I hope that I have given you some options. Good luck.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 5/6/2007


Looking Bad?

We were gone for the entire summer and the spa was left with only a bromine floater. It now looks like yuck! What do you suggest? Thanks for the help.

Ken G., Fayetteville, NC, 9/7/2008


I suggest that you start draining the water and do some rinsing with a garden hose. Clean out the filter and replace. Refill
Nano-Stick Clarifiers, forall types of pools and spas. with fresh water and add a double or triple dose of a quick dissolving chlorine or non-chlorine shock. Make sure that the pH is 7.2-7.6. Keep the Free Chlorine level high and the filter operating. Retest frequently and add more shock, as required. Eventually, the chlorine will destroy all of the "yuck" that developed on the walls, in the plumbing, in the filter and in the nooks and crannies. When things clear up, empty the spa and rinse off everything in sight. Now, you are ready to start from scratch. With a little time and effort, you should end up with crystal clear spa water. To help keep it that way, a Nano-Stick Clarifier would go a long way towards maintaining crystal-clear water. You still have to maintain proper sanitation and chemistry, but this product will clearly help improve the water quality and feel. I hope that I have been helpful. Good luck.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 9/7/2008


Baffling Cloud?

Hi Alan, I sure am glad I found this web site. Good information around here has been hard to come by. My saga begins last spring, when I changed the water it was already becoming cloudy. I have been using biguanide. I cleaned the spa then refilled it. A few days later it started clouding again, I drained and refilled it again. It still clouded a little bit, I tried clarifier with no success. At this point I just lived with it, but I did a bad thing and didn't change the water till ten day's ago (approx. 6 months). When I drained the water the tub had a considerable amount of scale?, Hard water? White residue everywhere. I pressure washed the tub and removed the jets and cleaned in vinegar. I filled the tub, turned on jets and tub filled with hard water particles. Drained and cleaned again. Now looks real good. Added chemicals and two days later started clouding again. Took water sample to dealer. pH was 7.4,calcium was 76, alkalinity was 180. I added 12oz of pH decreaser slowly .Next day water is cloudier. I shocked spa with 10oz hydrogen peroxide (2nd time since fill). On the ninth day after fill I can just barely see the bottom, the water is milky white. I had the water tested again with a computer analyzer and it showed everything in range. I decided to drain the water again, as the water level dropped 6 inches. I found a thick layer of white, hard substance covering surface of spa. The substance is very hard to remove. It is somewhat chalky when rubbed off. I am stumped. I know I am changing from biguanide. Any input would be appreciated. I can't  imagine water going so bad in only nine days. I am at a loss as what to do now or even what the problem is.

Tom S., Indiana, 10/22/2005


There's nothing in the information provided that points to an obvious cause. Your calcium hardness reading is not high enough to account for the problem. Unless, the reading is in error or you added a pH buffering product in the recent past. I would have the spa water and the tap water tested for calcium hardness. If the calcium level is approximately 76, it is not the problem and the high TA is not a problem. The biguanide sanitizer might have contributed to the cloudy water problems, by allowing the development of a biguanide-resistant microorganism. Switching to a chlorine, or even better to a bromine sanitizer, make sense. Start off with a clean slate. The addition of an ozone generator will greatly improve the water quality and reduce the chemical usage. Monitoring the chemistry, after switching from biguanide, should help you achieve proper water quality, but may not explain the problem. I hope that I have been helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 10/23/2005


Turning Green?

I have a new spa with an ozonator and a mineral spa purifier. I use one teaspoon of chlorine granules every other night. The first time I filled the spa it was fine for almost two weeks and then turned green. I refilled it again, and it turned green in a few days. I was also given MPS in the startup kit but the instructions said I could use either chlorine or MPS so I preferred as few chemicals as possible. How might I cure the green problem, and are all these chemicals really safe for my family to be soaking in? Thanks.

Marilyn R., 5/6/2008


I don't think that safety is the issue. Yes, the chemicals are safe, when used as directed. Pools turn green because of algae growth due to inadequate sanitation. Algae is not a common problem in most spas. The green color could be due to the presence of metals in the sourceUltraPure Ozone Generators water, especially if well water was used. Most likely the green color is due to excessive amounts of copper. There are two sources for the copper: corrosion of the heater core, if the pH was too low for extended periods of time or the source water. The combination of an ozonator and a mineral sanitizer usually works very well. An ozonator needs a backup sanitizer and the mineral sanitizer fills that role. However, adding chlorine every other day on top of this treatment could be considered overkill. The SPA FROG Mineral Sanitizer does not utilize copper, so it is not part of the problem! Make sure that the ozonator is operating properly and for several periods throughout the day. All you should have to add is a small amount of chlorine, so as to maintain a low level (approximately 1 PPM). The ozonator will do most of the work and the presence of the Free Chlorine will help assure proper sanitation. So that you start with a clean slate, empty the spa. If you are using well water, have the water tested for iron and add a metal treatment. Refill and add enough chlorine to boost the Free Chlorine level to 3 PPM. Make sure that the pH is 7.2-7.6 and that the TA and calcium are acceptable. From this point on add enough chlorine to maintain 1 PPM of Free Chlorine. Make sure that you test for Free Chlorine! As long as you have the MPS, add some after periods of heavy bather usage. I hope that this information will prove helpful. Let me know how it turns out.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 5/6/2008


The Blues?

We recently brought a home with an existing spa. It looked okay, water clear and everything when we moved in. Two weeks after we moved in we added some chlorine and pH chemicals that we purchased from a local dealer. Within a week the water was extremely blue, there is sediment on the bottom of the spa that is blue and our fingernails turned blue after getting in. (We had not noticed all of this before getting in the spa, our blue fingernails alerted us to the unusual color). The local dealer is telling us that it is the heater and because of the imbalance of pH our heater is about to "tank" and the blue is from the copper tube. This spa and heater are less than two years old. Could this dealer be right. What action should we take? Will draining the spa and changing the filters help us? It appears that my grey hot tub is now stained blue, is there anything that will take the blue off the spa liner? Will our spa ever be safe for us to enter after it is cleaned and restarted with new chemicals.

Cathy G., 3/17/2006


The dealer is correct! The cause of the problem was corrosion to the heater, that resulted from low pH condi
tions and Stain Reversall Kit.the presence of chlorine or bromine. Hopefully, the heater was not fatally destroyed. Fill the spa up and make sure that there is no chlorine present or at most a few tenths of a PPM. Add 1/2-1 pound MetalTrap Stain Remover, to the water and make sure that the pH is about 6.8. Allow to recirculate. Add more MetalTrap Stain Remover, as needed, until the discoloration has been dissolved. Drain and thoroughly clean the spa.  Refill and add a double dose of a quality metal treatment, such as Liquid MetalTrap, which is a true chelating agent and is effective over a broad pH range. Resume normal spa sanitizing and make sure that the pH remains in the 7.2-7.6 range. Discuss how the spa was being sanitized with the dealer, as this might have been part of the problem. I hope that this information will prove helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 3/18/2006



Clouding Up?

I have a small hot tub 1000 litres. I am using a 2 part bromine system. It seems that about every 2 weeks the water clouds up, murky like. I follow the chemicals directions, I use test strips and monitor alkalinity, pH, calcium hardness, bromine. I add defoamer as required and the odd shot of clarification liquid. 2 nights ago the water was clear. Tonite my water was cloudy and my bromine was not reading well, negative if you will. I usually do a daily routine for bromine. I test strip and add if low. Everything was fine two days ago, I missed one day and it clouded up. Anyway like I said virtually no reading tonight, so I added the prescribed weekly dose and the water turned slightly green, as well as staying cloudy. Question will the water clear as the bromine dissipates and it burns off the organics?

Phillip T., 9/11/2009


The water is becoming cloudy because there is not enough bromine to oxidize and decompose all of the organic debris and wastes and maintain control of the microorganisms. The bottoming out of the bromine level allows bacteria to start growing on the underwater surfaces.  You need to shock the spa and maintain an elevated bromine level, above 5 PPM, until the water clears. Thereafter, maintain a 3-5 PPM level, adding product on an as needed basis. I suggest that you add some of the oxidizer product after each use of the spa. Before using the spa, test the water and add additional product, as might be required and wait 1/2 hour before using the spa. The green color could be part of the same problem or it could be due to corrosion of the copper in the heater. Low pH conditions will allow bromine to corrode the copper. Have the water tested for copper and add a mineral treatment, if present. Thereafter, pay more attention to the pH and total alkalinity. Have you ever cleaned or replaced the filter cartridge? It might need servicing or replacement to restore proper efficiency. I hope that this information will prove helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 9/11/2009


From Clear To Cloudy?

I added a product that is supposed to lock in the pH of a spa and make it more stable. I followed the directions, but I ended up with very hazy spa water. The dealer said that my pH must have been too high to start. Some help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Bill D., Celebration, FL, 2/5/2009


While it is possible that the pH was too high to start with, the real cause of the problem is most likely due to the natural hardness of the water. These products should not be used if the calcium hardness is above 300 PPM. Even at levels between 200-300 PPM, clarity problems can result, depending upon the pH and total alkalinity. Personally, I suggest that you do not use such a product, if the calcium hardness o
f the spa water is above 200 PPM. Your filter should be able to remove the particles. The addition of one of those "Blue" Clarifiers should help speed up the removal of the suspended particles and help eliminate the spa water cloudiness problem. These liquid clarifiers can be good short term solutions. On the other hand, a Nano-Stick Clarifier can conveniently provide continuous clarifying action, for up to 3-4 months, at a time. After the water is clear, thoroughly clean the filter, with a hose. An even easier way to clean the filter is with THE BLASTER. It is an automatic cartridge filter cleaner that simply attaches to a garden hose. Afterwards, you might want to soak the cartridge in a solution made with a Spa Filter Cleaner. The best products to use are acidic cleaners formulated with low-foaming detergents. If the walls and bottom are coated white, you might be better off draining and cleaning the spa and starting over. In the future, you should stabilize or "lock in" your pH by maintaining the total alkalinity at 80-120 PPM. In addition, you might want to add a dose of Liquid Metal Trap, in order to help keep calcium and other minerals from precipitating and causing cloudiness or discoloration. The pH Buffer Products work very well in soft water areas. However, in hard water areas, there is a possibility of causing a cloudy, hazy or dull spa water problem. I hope that I have been helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 2/5/2009


Hard Water Causing Cloudiness?

I'm hoping you can help me with this one. I have had a hot tub for three months. The water tends to go cloudy after a few weeks. We've changed the water twice already as a result, thinking it was full of too many dissolved solids. (We did use it an awful lot in the first month!) With this third filling of water, we had a malfunction of our temperature gauge, and so left the tub alone for a week while we waited for a repairman. During that week I watched the water go cloudy, despite us not bathing in it or adding any chemicals. The pH tends to drift high (to 7.8-8.2), and the TA is always high (240 ppm at least) - we live in an area with lots of dissolved minerals, including calcium (always over 1000 ppm total hardness). So, I began wondering if some of those minerals were coming out of solution and that was causing the cloudiness. Googling 'saturation' and 'hot tub' brought me to your website and the Langelier index. But now I'm stumped. It seems that I need to bring down the TA and the pH. How do I bring down the TA? And 2nd question: Our hot tub company tells us to fill the tub with city water, rather than the softened water we use in our house, so the dishes and laundry don't get covered with deposits. I wonder, if we should perhaps do half and half? I'd appreciate your thoughts. 

Sophie, F., Guelph, Ontario, Canada, 4/12/2007


By all means use the softened water!  Your water is very hard and could contain dissolved metals. Otherwise, you could
ColorQ all-digital water analyzers, for pools and spas. continuously be in a heap of trouble. After the spa is filled take a sample into a local dealer for a water analysis. If you use 10% city water and 90% softened water, you should have to do very little. You might not need even need to adjust the calcium hardness, to compensate for the use for softened water. Test the water to be sure and adjust, if necessary. Check the pH and TA and adjust, as necessary. Once done, it should be treated like any other spa. The dealer was wrong in his thinking. Using mostly softened water will allow you to obtain a proper hardness level (150-200 PPM) and avoid, cloudiness and scaling and filtration issues. This lower hardness should avoid cloudy issues, so long as proper sanitation and filtration are maintained.  A good, reliable water tester will help keep your chemistry in the right ranges, improving water quality, bather comfort and helping to protect your heater. I suggest an all-digital ColorQ Tester. I hope that this information will help clarify the subject.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 4/12/2007


Floating White Particles?

We recently purchased a home which has an above ground spa. Unfortunately we were not left any reference materials related to the spa. It has been cleaned, but we are still seeing small black and viscous white particles floating throughout the water, no one has used the spa since we moved in. I assumed that the filter would take care of this, but the particles are still there. Is there something that we can do about this as we REALLY want to use our spa. Thank you for any advice that you can offer.

Angela G., 5/8/2009

What you are describing is the flaking off of scale and copper corrosion deposits from the heater coil. The white particles are calcium carbonate and the dark ones are probably oxidized copper. I suggest that you add a dose of a calcium scale treatment and a quality metal treatment, such as Liquid MetalTrap, which is a true chelating agent. These products should help end the problem within a few days. Have the water tested for copper and calcium hardness, as this will provide insight into the problem. If the problems continue, you may want to do the following. Allow the chlorine level to zero out. Lower the pH to about 6.0 and keep recirculating the water. When there seems to be no more white particles, drain and clean the spa. Refill, add a dose of a calcium scale treatment and resume normal operation. Depending upon the type of filter that you have, calcium minerals can be passing right through the filter. I hope that this information proves helpful.

Sincerely. Alan Schuster, 5/9/2009

Return To Top Of Page
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thank you for visiting AskAlanAQuestion.Com
If you found the website helpful, please tell your friends and dealers.
If not, please tell us. Your suggestions are appreciated.

 

Aqualab Systems., Inc. does not make any warranty or representation, either expressed or implied, regarding the accuracy or completeness of the information provided by this website; nor does Aqualab Systems., Inc. assume any liability of any kind whatsoever related to, or resulting from, any use or reliance on this information. The content of this website should not be used, if it is conflict with any applicable federal, state or local regulations or guidelines.

©, 2002-14, A.S., Inc. All rights reserved.